Top 50 Best Films Of 2014


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And without any further ado, the movies we will be remembering 2014 for are:

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1- BOYHOOD
(Richard Linklater)

The year’s most remarkable achievement was Richard Linklater’s filming during twelve years the growth of a kid from child to adult, which has turned out to be a piece of film history as much as a true slice of life.
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2- MR. TURNER
(Mike Leigh)

For the second time on his career, Leigh put on hold his superbly observed everyday stories to depict the work of an artist from the Victorian-era, wisely avoiding the traps of conventional biopics with extraordinary results.
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3- LEVIATHAN
(Andrey Zvyagintsev)

An epic battle of biblical proportions, the impossible fight of an honest man versus a corrupt state had an universal resonance that transcended the brilliantly written criticism about Russia’s current situation.
the grand budapest hotel
4- THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL
(Wes Anderson)

Wes Anderson’s refined his personal style delivering what’s arguably his first masterpiece with its old-fashioned, slapstick-infused comic strip narrative and a Russian dolls-like structure.
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5- UNDER THE SKIN
(Jonathan Glazer)

An unsettling sensorial experience, this mind blowing story of alien invader feeding off solitary men she finds in the streets of Glasgow gave Scarlett Johansson her first critically acclaim role in ages and became one of sci-fi’s most distinctive works.
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6- BIRDMAN
(Alejandro G. Iñárritu)

The biggest winner of the awards season, technically impressive and with a cast on top of their game, underlined by a self-referencing lead by Michael Keaton, capturing the vibrant madness of a theatrical production 48 hours before its opening.
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7- STRANGER BY THE LAKE
(Alain Guiraudie)

One of the boldest propositions of the year was this Hitchcock-influenced French thriller whose killer on the loose in a gay cruising site subject unveiled a clever metaphor about the way gay sexuality deals with the threat of AIDS.
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8- IDA
(Pawel Pawlikowski)

The year’s Foreign Language Oscar winner was a sober look at recent scars in Polish history, shot in exquisite black and white, through the tale of an orphan novice putting faith to the test when allowed to visit an auntie and track her parents' fate down.
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9- FOXCATCHER
(Bennett Miller)

Based in the story of the billionaire who killed a wrestling athlete whose Olympic team he sponsored, a disturbingly bleak film about the self-destructive fear of not living up to expectations was anchored on three great performances.
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10- NORTE, THE END OF HISTORY
(Lav Diaz)

Lav Díaz confirmed himself as one of the maximum representatives of slow cinema with his four hour adaptation of Dostoevsky‘s Crime and Punishment and its ambitious showcase of the current social, political and historical situation in the Philippines.
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11- NIGHTCRAWLER
(Dan Gilroy)

The writer of The Bourne Legacy’s screenplay jumped into the director’s chair with this instant cult classic that mixed dark media satire with edge of the seat thriller, boasting a sadly snubbed, career best central performance by a creepy Jake Gyllenhaal.
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12- WINTER SLEEP
(Nuri Ceylan Bilge)

Loosely based on Chekhov short story “The Wife, this year’s Palm D’Or winner was another master work from Turkey’s most celebrated author, who reflects here about his country’s intellectual class and how distant they’ve become from real life.
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13- TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT
(Dardenne Brothers)

Marion Cotillard was the factory worker who needs to convince her colleagues to vote for her not to be sacked, even when that means they will lose their bonuses, in another extraordinarily poignant social drama by the Dardenne brothers.
WHIPLASH
14- WHIPLASH
(Damien Chazelle)

JK Simmons delivered one of the year’s most iconic characters as a teacher of dubious methods crashing with a pupil who shared his quest for greatness. It combined the slick elegance of jazz with a vertiginous pace and a grippingly tight screenplay.
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15- INHERENT VICE
(Paul Thomas Anderson)

Successfully achieving what had been deemed impossible with this faithful adaptation of one of Thomas Pynchon’s books, PTA chose this druggy PI tale describing the moment when America’s hippy dream gave way to the troubled cold war era.
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16- MAPS TO THE STARS
(David Cronember)

Brilliantly obscure farce bringing back Cronenberg’s most unsettling and satisfying side. His look at the nightmare behind the glitz and glamour of the dream factory was the most disturbing vision of Hollywood since David Lynch’s Mulholland Drive.
A MOST VIOLENT YEAR
17- A MOST VIOLENT YEAR
(J.C. Chandor)

Set in the decaying NY of the early 80’s, Oscar Isaac and Jessica Chastain nailed their roles as the ambitious self-made businessman struggling to keep troubles at bay, reputation intact and appearances up and her controlling, less scrupulous wife.
20,000 Days on Earth
18- 20,000 DAYS ON EARTH
(Iain Forsyth & Jane Pollard)

Original depiction of the work and the legend behind songwriter Nick Cave, which seemed like one of those documentaries ordered to go with a deluxe edition of his latest album, but grew into something more special, managing to both reveal the man and amplify his myth.
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19-NYMPHOMANIAC PT. 1
(Lars Von Trier)

Denmark’s enfant terrible freely explored the boundaries of female sexuality through witty comparisons to unrelated subjects in an unveven two-parter, the first of which is far superior.
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20- MOMMY
(Xavier Dolan)

Motherly love prevails over any life obstacle in enjoyably over the top melodrama. Anne Dorval and the rest of its cast shines in the Canadian wunderkid’s most memorable film to date.
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21- GONE GIRL
(David Fincher)

Gillian Flynn adapted her own best seller in Fincher’s slick, gripping thriller set against the backdrop of a marriage in crisis, preserving all the key elements needed to translate its big paperback success into the big screen.
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22- SNOWPIERCER
(Bong Joon Ho)

The Korean auteur hired a stellar international cast to tackle the metaphors of ‘Snowpiercer’, another post-apocalyptic novel in which mankind’s few survivors live in a constantly running train whose wagons replicate our social structure.
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23- THE LEGO MOVIE
(Phil Lord & Christopher Miller)

Arguably the Oscars’ worst snub of the year, this endlessly inventive animated picture had a powerful message at his core of embracing what makes us unique in a world that tends to standardize us all.
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24- THE GOLDEN DREAM
(Diego Quemada-Díez)

Former Ken Loach collaborator debuted with the moving account of three kids’ trip from the slums of Guatemala to the US border, dreaming of a better life, and the abuse, trouble and despair in their way.
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25- CITIZENFOUR
(Laura Poitras)

Structured as an espionage thriller, whistle blower Edward Snowden contacted documentarian Laura Poitras to film his, now historical, intelligence leaks about USA’s illegal surveillance of everyone’s private communications .
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26- FRANK
(Lenny Abrahamson)

Depression and rock and roll lifestyle were the subjects of this enjoyable indie, inspired by the late British rock icon Frank Sidebottom and based on one of his band members’ novel ‘Oh Blimey!”
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27- LOCKE
(Steven Knight)

Tom Hardy’s breath taking one man show is the main attraction in this deceitfully simple thriller, where a man in a car tries to hold the crumbling pieces of his life together from his mobile.
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28- THE PAST
(Asghar Farhadi)

Perhaps less intricate than his former work, but almost as powerful. The Iranian auteur refined his touch for absorbing, multi-layered drama graced by Bérénice Bejo's Cannes winner turn.
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29- A TOUCH OF SIN
(Jia Zhangke)

Zhangke's most accesible work to date is comprised by multiple tales taken from news stories, forming a mosaic of violent and symbolic criticism to the loss of Chinese identity brought by the clash between traditional and capitalist values.
PRIDE
30- PRIDE
(Matthew Warchus)

Touching comedy about solidarity, set during Thatcher’s England and based on the real story of a group of Gay and Lesbian activists joining forces with Welsh miners to confront her administration’s attacks against their communities.
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31- ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE
(Jim Jarmusch)

The quintessential indie filmmaker shook our vampire fatigue off with his uniquely romantic take on the Gothic myth as a metaphor for artists condemned to live forever in a hostile world.
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32- CALVARY
(John Michael McDonagh)

Brendan Gleeson and Chris O’Dowd excelled in this dark tragic comedy about an Irish priest facing a death threat in confession from one of his parish’s members.
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33- WE ARE THE BEST!
(Lukas Moodysson)

Moodysson returned on top form, as shown on early works such as ‘Together’ with this charming story of a trio of teen girls forming a punk band to rebel about the senseless pains of growing up.
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34- OF HORSES AND MEN
(Benedikt Erlingsson)

The promising first feature of this Icelandic helmer combined the beauty of his country’s wild landscapes with a rather unique attempt to tell its story from both equine and human point of views.
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35- SELMA
(Ava DuVernay)

David Oyelowo’s heartfelt portrait of the strengths and weaknesses of Dr. Luther King lifted this
sober but impeccable look at his era and the legacy of his history forging peaceful marches for equality.
THE BABADOOK
36- THE BABADOOK
(Jennifer Kent)

This Aussie psychological horror in which the consequences of a family tragedy materialized an evil fairytale creature through a troubled kid’s fantasies stood up as a true genre original.
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37- STARRED UP
(David Mackenzie)

Ben Mendelsohn and Jack O'Connell impressed in this gripping drama as the violent father teaching the unspoken rules of life in jail to his young offender son when they end up in the same prison.
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38- TWENTY FEET FROM STARDOM
(Morgan Neville)

Joyous tribute to the role of the female back-up singer in pop, initially shaped as an anthology of early girl bands to later delve into personal stories of amazing talents who never got their break.
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39- THE IMMIGRANT
(James Gray)

Sadly unreleased in the UK, the misadventures two emigrant Polish sisters arriving to Ellis Islands brought another top-notch performance by Marion Cotillard, next to fine turns by Joaquin Phoenix and Jeremy Renner.
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40- INTERSTELLAR
(Christopher Nolan)

Every bit the grandiose space travel epic we were promised, also the most divisive film of the awards season. Many elements of its storyline struggled to pass logical scrutiny, but somehow its whole managed to be more than the sum of its parts.
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41- WILD TALES
(Damian Szifrón)

Six histrionic, corrosively hilarious stories of people taking their frustrations to extremes. A bit uneven, but refreshingly irreverent, confirming the arrival of a distinctive new voice in hispanic filmmaking.
BLUE RUIN
42- BLUE RUIN
(Jeremy Saulnier)

The story of a loner returning to his hometown to avenge the death of his parents after their killer gets released from jail shaped up this dark thriller, one of the most underrated US indies of 2014.
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43- THE DANCE OF REALITY
(Alejandro Jodorowsky)

The Chilean counterculture legend proved he is still a vital voice in cinema with this surreal and charming childhood memoir sadly left to trawl the festival and one-off screenings circuit, without proper distribution.
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44- HELI
(Amat Escalante)

Escalante won best director at Cannes with this uniquely visual yet extremely brutal story of humble family accidentally involved in a drug-related crime, trapped in between corrupt police and local mafia.
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45- LA ISLA MINIMA (Marshland)
(Alberto Rodríguez)

Branded as the Spanish “True Detective”, this intriguing thriller about teenage disappearances in a humble Andalusian village set in early post-Franco Spain was the deserved winner at this year’s Goyas.
life itself
46- LIFE ITSELF
(Steve James)

Access all areas account of Roger Ebert’s career, a life entirely dedicated to cinema, in this fine, intimate tribute to the most popular film critic of all times who sadly passed away last year.
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47- THE DOUBLE
(Richard Ayoade)

The British comedian’s sophomore work was a surreal take on a short doppelganger tale by Dostoevsky, set on a sombre dystopian future reminiscent of the best Terry Gilliam.
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48- OMAR
(Hany Abu-Assad)

Love, friendships and freedom fighters blackmailed into betrayal were the backbone of this superbly scripted Palestinian drama, as surrounded by controversy as anything coming from that conflict stricken area.
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49- JODOROWSKY'S DUNE
(Frank Pavich)

Fascinating documentary about Jodorowsky’s failed attempt to adapt sci-fi novel ‘Dune’ to the big screen and his extraordinary vision which included collaborations with Moebius, Dali; Mick Jagger; Pink Floyd …
a most wanted man
50- A MOST WANTED MAN
(Anton Corbjin)

The former video clip director, already on his third feature, gave the late Philip Seymour-Hoffman a worthy swansong role on a great adaptation of John Le Carre’s spionage classic ‘A Most Wanted Man'.