The Noughties: Honorary Mentions- Latin


10-LOS SUPER SEVEN-La Sirena

Reggaeton kept on being the biggest popular revolution across Latin-America. The Latin equivalent to hip-hop was still generating unanimous hatred among prudes and middle classes due to the vulgarity of its lyrics and rhythmical simplicity. However, there were a few artists who realized the potential of its folk and Caribbean roots, elevating the genre to higher levels, with Tego Calderón as maximum exponent. The Buena Vista Social Club hangover brought further interest for Cuba. Puerto-Rican duo Calle 13 revalidated latin rap and Manu Chao’s populism knew no frontiers. In the last few years, a new cumbia linked to electro and other top club trends awoke the interest of such groundbreaking artists as DJ/Rupture. The genre’s updating process has just begun.

9-JUANES-Camisa Negra

8-JUANA MOLINA-Un Dia

7-LA YEGROS-Trocitos

6-DADDY YANKEE-Gasolina

5-OMARA PORTUONDO-La Sitiera

4-JULIETA VENEGAS-Andar Conmigo

3-TEGO CALDERON-Los Maté

2-MANU CHAO-La Marea (home video)

1-CALLE 13-No Hay Nadie Como Tú

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