Archive for October, 2017

The Best Films We Saw At #LFF2017



Looking back at 2017’s BFI London Film Festival and after careful deliberation, we finish our review with the list of the best films we saw at this year’s event. We began our coverage recommending 15 films we had already seen at Cannes and other festivals. A list that perfectly complements this one and whose, at least, first 8 titles (among them, The Florida Project, You Were Never Really Here, The Killing Of A Sacred Deer, Summer 1993, etc.) deserve to be included in any best-of the festival recap. We also took a look at a selection of the lesser-known titles from the different strands in former posts. But now its the turn for the films that we actually liked the most during the festival. Altogether, they shape up a promising look at some of the best work that (hopefully) will come to our art-house cinemas during the next twelve months. Read the rest of this entry »

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#LFF2017 Interview With Juliana Rojas and Marco Dutra (Good Manners)


Brazilian directors Juliana Rojas and Marco Dutra have crafted one of the most surprising films of the year with ‘Good Manners’. After winning an award at Locarno for its unique combination of social realism with multiple genres, ‘Good Manners’ was also selected for the London Film Festival’s official competition. Rojas and Dutra came to present their film and we had the chance to talk with them about, among other things, their collaboration; their unique approach to genre; the social aspect of their work; their classic influences and a particularly distinctive use of colour. Check the interview in full here: Read the rest of this entry »

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#LFF2017 Interview with Xavier Legrand (Custody)

French actor turned director Xavier Legrand came to the London Film Festival to introduce his debut feature ‘Custody.’ Fresh from winning two prizes at Venice, ‘Custody’ is a harrowing tale of domestic violence that follows up the story of Legrand’s first, Oscar-nominated short film. It focuses on how legal loopholes can allow abusive parents to perpetuate the intimidation to their families. We met the Gallic filmmaker for a short interview and talked about what brought him to the issue; his acting career and the cinematic influences of this film. Read the rest of this entry »

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#LFF2017 Interview with Carla Simón (Summer 1993)

The London Film Festival goes on and in between a tight film watching schedule, we had the chance to have a chat with Catalonian director Carla Simón. Her debut ‘Summer 1993’ is one of our recommended films from the festival, conquering audiences wherever is shown. This story of a little girl who is send to live in the countryside with the family of her aunt and uncle after her parents die of AIDS has been selected by the Spanish Film Academy for the Foreign Language Oscar. It has been one of this year’s LFF hot tickets, as well as a favourite for the First Feature Competition. We talked to her about the autobiographical aspects of her story; the challenges of working with children; the film’s remarkable cast and the experiences of her student days in London. Read the rest of this entry »

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#LFF2017 Recommended: Call Me By Your Name (Luca Guadagnino)

Italian auteur Luca Guadagnino completes a trilogy dedicated to human desire with ‘Call Me by Your Name.’ The follow-up of ‘I Am Love’ and ‘A Bigger Splash’ is arguably the best of the three. A tender, finely observed gay tale of first love between Elio, the son of an Archaeology professor- a revelation-like performance by Timothée Chalamet- and Oliver, the doctorate student who comes to help the academic with his research and archives, played by Armie Hammer. Both leads initially rejected the roles, but the director convinced them to take the challenge.

Like the rest of his work, this romance is imbued in sun-bathed Mediterranean sensuality, social gatherings over food and the everyday summer activities typical of a town like Crema, part of the Italian Lombardy region, which provides a strong sense of place that becomes instrumental to the development of the story. The cast during the press conference recalled the memorable immersive experience that preparing for the role for weeks in such great location turned out to be. Read the rest of this entry »

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#LFF2017: A Palestinean Road Movie, New French Noir, Spanish Horror…

The London Film Festival is now in full gear and this edition is being particularly good to discover the work of up-and-coming or under the radar filmmakers from all over the world, offering very personal visions. Among them a Mexican documentary about drug-related violence; an irreverent revision of French Noir; a Palestinean road movie; a Spanish “social” horror; a look at the Belgium Justice system; an experimental doc about illegal immigration through the Sonora desert and a harrowing Polish drama set against the backdrop of the Rwandan genocide. All of them very worthy of your time. Read the rest of this entry »

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Films To Discover From The #LFF2017 Programme

The London Film Festival began and with it the levels of excitement in any London cinephile have reached their annual peak. Too many great films and too little time make us often remain in our comfort zones, missing out on the many chances for discovering new talent from all over the world. And yes, we can’t wait to see the new Guillermo del Toro, Venice winner fantasy melodrama ‘The Shape of Water,’ or Luca Guadagnino’s acclaimed gay romance ‘Call Me By Your Name’, or the closing gala and Toronto Audience winner “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri’, to name just three of the galas. And we will definitely try to catch up the latest work from favourites such as Michael Haneke, Lynne Ramsay, Richard Linklater, Yorgos Lanthimos, Alexander Payne, Todd Haynes, Lucrecia Martel o Sebastian Lelio.

But going beyond the season’s big titles, the different strands and the excellent Experimenta section offer lesser-known treats for all tastes. Here’s a few recommendations for those in search of the new and ground-breaking. Read the rest of this entry »

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